Ed Poxon

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Last summer, Ed teaching Lottie, our granddaughter.

I cannot go on with this blog without referring to Ed Poxon, who died suddenly on Friday 21st of June.

Ed was a kind and generous man who provided tailored environments for students to develop.   Indeed, he was such a pivotal person in the development of many people.  So many have said “without Ed, I wouldn’t….” have become a teacher, or finished my course, or started on a degree, or realised that I had the potential, or have the confidence; the list goes on.  Without Ed, I would not have started the degree course or come to the realisation that I can model and sculpt figures.

I enjoyed my wide-ranging chats with Ed, from his father’s time in RAF to the science behind making single crystal turbine blades, not to mention his humorous quips and discussions on UK politics.  He had huge amounts of knowledge that he would enthusiastically pass on. He would go the extra mile for the struggling student, and rescued many of them in ways that felt more like “just a bit of assistance”.

Ed also had a large network of people to call upon for “favours”.  I don’t know what other word to use.  Moreover, I do not know how he got so many people to say “yes” to his requests for demonstrations, student placements, money for projects, etc but people kept saying “yes”.

At 52, and with a small child needing a dad, he has departed the world far too early.  He will be missed by all that knew him and there is a large hole left by his absence.

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4 thoughts on “Ed Poxon

  1. Andy Poxon

    My ‘little brother’ will be sorely missed by his family and those closest too him. What we are all learning is that his professional life wasn’t just about going through the motions and teaching to earn a crust but nurturing students to be all they can be. Not just academically either having read many of the wonderful kind words including this one. I would like to believe that he will live on in each life he touched. A fine legacy indeed.

    Reply
    1. vincent Post author

      Yes, Andy, your “little brother” had a great field of influence both at an academic level but also on a personal level for so many. There was a lot of subtlety in how the worked that, unless you stopped to analyse what was going on, it was easily missed. How did he manage to get one person to stop and re-evaluate an idea [and then drop it] and seamlessly move to the next and engender confidence in an nascent idea and develop it – WITH neither person feeling manipulated or, indeed having Ed being directive? He was a class operator and will be sorely missed! I, for one, will miss him a great deal.

      Reply
  2. Jerry Worley

    I will miss Ed greatly. As others have said he was willing to go that extra mile for many people other than myself. The world will be a poorer place without him. Rest in peace Ed

    Reply
    1. vincent Post author

      Yes Jerry, Ed was a good man – a mensch – always interested in others and helping his students to attain the best they could. He will be sorely missed.

      Reply

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